Designing a sewing room in EQ7

We’re moving in 2 weeks, and I have to leave the love of my life behind…

Sigh.

Sigh.

Okay, maybe I’m going a bit overboard there. But a lesson learned: Never build the perfect sewing space that you can’t take with you. I didn’t expect to move from this house for a long, long time. You never know what the future holds….

My new room won’t be this fancy. But as long as you’ve got a place to quilt, that’s the only thing that matters, right??  I’ve designed 3 sewing spaces so far, and I’ve gotten to the place where I know exactly what I need, how I need it and where I need. I’m very excited that in our new house my basement sewing room will be twice as big as this one. That means my sewing area AND Laverne & Shirley (my frame & midarm) will be in the same room. Hallelujah!! Used to be I’d pull out graph paper to design my rooms. This time I decided to play with EQ and see if I could design it in there. I did. I’m no pro in EQ (that would be Peggi!), but have always wanted to play around with the drawing section. This was the perfect opportunity to learn more about it. I created a couple of boxes in Patchdraw Motif. Just simple boxes. They can be resized on my quilt, so I didn’t need a bunch of blocks. I even found a sewing machine in the Block Library/Contemporary applique/Your design studio section! Can someone tell me why they don’t have an iron???? Or a chair?? Aren’t those a staple in a sewing room????

blocks

I started by using 1″=1 foot. My room is 17’2″ x 27′, so I created a new quilt layout with one block sized 17.2″ x 27″.

layout-size

Yeah, these are just approximate measurements, so .2 = .25 on my layout. I’m not worried about a couple of inches!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What does my quilting room need? A sewing area, a cutting table and my LA/frame. So I added 4 of the blocks of I created, and stretched them to start designing. I stretched and played until I came up with a layout that appealed to me. The text feature was great to label the spaces.

Design1

Okay, but you’d be able to see my mess from the door. Not gonna work….

 

The following pics don’t show the measurements:

design3

Let’s flip this around. I added the clearance area needed for the longarm frame. Better, but I need to face the door when I’m sewing (must be some feng shui thing in my head). With the sewing machine on that side of the table, I don’t have enough clearance to the left of the machine without having to scrunch up my quilt when I sew. Nope, this one’s not gonna work either…..

 

Aaah....much better.....

Aaah….much better…..

Once I liked the layout, I added more boxes – the cabinets. I’m planning to use Ikea cabinets, so I stretched my boxes to the size of the cabinets. I colored these boxes yellow. This also allowed me to narrow down the exact size of my sewing area.

design5

Then I started adding things I needed in my room – a design wall, my ironing area, a fabric storage pantry and pegboards for my tools and patterns. Two bookshelves with cabinets below to make up for the wall cabinet storage I won’t have here. Oh yes, and I need a TV and maybe a sitting area for hand sewing. Let’s make it comfortable, dangnabbit!

design6And, finally, measurements so we know where everything will be placed.

Design7I know that this will be a work in progress – The sewing area and cutting table will be built first, and the other items added on as the pocketbook allows. But it will be totally portable, so if I ever have to move again, it’s coming with me 🙂

Now, I’m off to create my cutting table in EQ. It needs lots of shelves, and pegboard to hang my cutting tools, and…….

Cindi 100

Using EQ7 to make scallops

The black floral stack-n-whack top is quilted and ready for binding. Yay!

6.

I’ve never been a fan of those large empty triangles that go along with on-point blocks.   They look awkward to me. I decided this quilt is the perfect candidate to play with a scalloped edge.

7.

I’ve never done a scalloped border, so I turned to The Googles for help.  Every single tutorial I found said to use a plate, bowl, or pizza pan to mark my curves.  Hmph.  None of my bowls or pizza pans were big enough.  Plus, I realized that I wanted my curves to be more oval-shaped than round.

So I decided to create my scallop curves in EQ7.  Here’s how I did it.

I measured the blocks corner to corner.

(Sidebar: I’m including the black sashing in this measurement.  I sashed each individual block instead of running long strips of fabric down each row.  This results in more accurate alignment of my blocks because all I have to do is match the corners and seams of the blocks.)

block border.

See the yellow arrows?  Those are the real corners of this block.

The blocks are 15 inches long (from yellow arrow to yellow arrow), and my quilt border is 5 inches wide (from the outermost point of the block to the outer edge of the quilt).

Next, I went to EQ and clicked on the Block worktable.  Currently, the block size is 6 inches by 6 inches.

eq size.

I changed it to 5 inches by 15 inches.

EQ 5.

Next, I clicked on the curve pencil (see toolbar on the left side) and drew from the bottom left corner to the top left corner.  I found that if I started at the top, the curve went the other way.

eq3.

To change the depth of the arc, click on the second arrow in the left toolbar, then click on the arc.  I made mine a little more pronounced.

eq4.

I then clicked File, Print, Block, and after double-checking that my block size was correct, printed my scallop.  Because it is 15 inches long, it printed on 2 sheets.  I taped them, cut on the curve, and voila!  My scallop template is ready.

making scallops.

I used bar soap to mark the curves.  I know it won’t leave marks, it washes out easily, and it won’t fade or disappear as I handle the quilt.

scallops.

When I got to the corner, the scallops were so close to meeting that I just winged it and connected the arcs freehand.

scallops2.

The next part is the most important part.  DO NOT CUT THE SCALLOPS AT THIS POINT!  You need to sew the binding on first.  If you cut the scallops first, you will have a nightmare mess of bias edges to deal with as you sew the binding.

attach.

And that’s how you design a scalloped border in Electric Quilt!

peg large sig

 

EQ for T-Shirt Quilts

I love EQ for T-shirt quilts. I seem to be making a lot of them lately, and love being able to try out my layouts before I even take my rotary cutter to the shirts. I’m currently making one for a friend’s daughter’s graduation, and wanted to send her pictures of what the quilt could look like with different fabrics. She’s in Ohio, I’m in Michigan. There’s no way to get together to sit down together to do this. Shea is a soccer player, so I found some nice soccer fabric that wasn’t “kiddie” to use in it.

Click to enlarge

 

I took pictures of all the shirts and loaded them into EQ.

This mock-up is a big, fat “YUCK”!

That border is waaay to dark, and the sashings catch the eye instead of the shirts.

It needs a pop of color, too, doesn’t it? It’s pretty boring.

This one is OUT.

 

Click to enlarge

 

I decided to use the soccer fabric in the border instead.

MUCH better. I like the way the yellow 1/2″ border on the outside frames the quilt. But the sashings look washed out, don’t they? What if we add another pop of color just outside the sashing and made the sashings black?

 

 

 

Click to enlarge

 

 

 

Looks good. A definite maybe. I like the way the soccer fabric “reads” as a mottled grey color. Keeps the eye on the shirts, not the border.

 

 

 

Click to enlarge

 

 

Let’s try a pop of red. We are Ohio State Buckeyes, after all!

Oooh, that looks SO nice! And look how that completely changed the look of the quilt!

 

 

 

Click to enlarge

 

 

What would white look like? It was a surprise to me that I actually liked it. Almost frames it like a picture, doesn’t it?

 

 

 

 

 

I enjoy trying out different fabrics and colors to see what happens. I don’t “imagine” things well, and need to see them to really get a feel for what a quilt will look like. This is why I love EQ. I don’t know it as well as Peggi does (she’s a true whiz at it!) but I’ve got the t-shirt quilts down to a fine science. And I love being able to give my customers choices. I can try out the fabrics before I buy them, and changes can easily be made before I start cutting up the shirts!

If you’re interested in making one of these, I’ve written a tutorial for beginners that you can download here. They’re sure a lot of fun, and I’ve made some extra “fabric money” making them for others!

Fun with EQ7

Last night as I was perusing posts on QuilterBlogs, I came across a post that showed a picture of an absolutely beautiful quilt.  It was the cover of a book, but the picture was cropped in a way that excluded the name and author of the book. I did quite a bit of digging, but couldn’t find any further information.  So I opened up my trusty EQ7 and re-created it.

This is close to how the original quilt was laid out, except it didn’t have the inner diamond border.
wpid-s2b-white-star-2011-03-30-18-44.jpg It had a border of half-square triangles instead, but the layout of the HSTs at the corners was the subject of much debate and dissension amongst the male occupants of my house, so I changed the border to diamonds.  It was agreed that they were a better fit anyway, since the quilt essentially has a diamond theme going on.

wpid-s2b-blue-white-star-2011-03-30-18-44.jpgThen we started playing with color options, which is one of my favorite things about EQ.  This one with the blue background ended up being one of my favorites.

wpid-s2b-blue-brown-star-2011-03-30-18-44.jpgThis navy and tan one is nice, crisp and masculine.  Civil War reproduction fabrics would be great here!

Other color variations we played with ranged from a very pleasant dark teal with pale teal background, which my son said looked like ice;

wpid-s2b-ice-quilt-2011-03-30-18-44.jpg

to a very patriotic red, white, and blue (LOVE this one!);

wpid-s2b-rwb-star-2011-03-30-18-44.jpg

to a blinding bright yellow and red, then a boring pink and green, and finally an absolutely horrid chartreuse and olive combination.  I’ll spare you the awfulness!

It was a gratifying experience, being able to reconstruct the quilt even though I didn’t have access to a pattern or close-up pictures, and ended up being a nice way to spend the evening – creating quilts without actually sewing!

wpid-large-sig-2011-03-30-18-44.png

An EQ dilemma

I have a question for fellow EQ-ers.  When you figure out your yardage requirements, how far off does EQ turn out to be?

I drew up a Carpenter’s Wheel in EQ7 simply so I could estimate yardage.

wpid-carpenters-wheel-1024x1024-2011-01-26-12-33.jpg

(Ignore the applique – I’m still working on it.)

The finished quilt measures 60 x60, the blocks are 6 x 6.  EQ says I need 2 1/4 yards of the dark green, and 5/8 of the light green.  I was unhappy with this, because I only have 2 yards of the dark green fabric, and it’s out of print!  The more I looked at it, the more I thought that can’t be right.  I’ve heard other people say that EQ is generous in the yardage requirements, so I drew it out on paper.  According to MY math, I need just under 2 yards (67 inches, to be exact) of the dark green, and 1/4 of the light green.

So, what are your experiences with EQ yardage requirements?  Should I trust EQ, or my own math?  I’m terrified to cut into my gorgeous but limited fabric!

I love EQ!

Remember my dilemma in my last post about how to make the wave border? I figured it out. I had forgotten that I had created my quilt in EQ (that’s what I get for procrastinating!). Here’s my EQ design:

wpid-EQDP.BMP-2010-09-4-16-12.bmp

Looks pretty darn close to my actual quilt, doesn’t it? Well, lookie there – I had already designed the border I wanted on EQ! So I printed out the blocks, taped them together and -voila! – a border template. With a PERFECT fit! No math to do, no measurements to take.  How can you not love this program?! I would have never thought to use EQ to design unique borders, but I’ll be doing it more often, I’m sure of that 🙂

wpid-DP-border1-2010-09-4-16-12.jpg

I penciled in the border, so I’ll baste along that line and use it as my cutting line when I trim it up.

wpid-DP-border2-2010-09-4-16-12.jpg

It’s on the frame now. This is the first time I’ve ever tried floating the quilt. Usually I put the quilt top on both bars. It’s time to step out of the comfort zone!

wpid-DP-on-frame2-2010-09-4-16-12.jpg

Now if I could only figure out what kind of quilting to do on this thing. I’m not one of those people that the quilt “talks” to them and they just know what quilting to do. Nope. I swear that whenever I put a quilt on the frame I completely forget every pattern I know. Blank as a school chalkboard in summer. Nothing. Nada. I have to cruise the web until I see a design and say “Hey! I know how to do that!” and I’ve got my design. I’m so original.

wpid-Cindi-Signature-large-2010-09-4-16-12.png

Dresden Plate in EQ

So, here’s the pattern I decided on for my Dresden Plate. A big shout-out to Peggi for helping me figure out the sashing block. She rocks on this program! Connecting Threads has this fabric on clearance and I’m thinking I’ll need more for all those sashing blocks so I’ve ordered 1/2 yard of 12 different ones. It was only $1.48/half yard!

So, what do you think?:

wpid-dresden-plate-1-2010-01-6-05-34.jpg

I’d really like a scalloped border for this quilt, but haven’t figured out how to do that in EQ yet. I’ll have to work on that. I think a scalloped border would soften the sharp edges of the plates and look very nice. But I’ll stick with this one for now!

LOL – I’ll probably be kicking myself because I won’t be able to find more of the purple fabric I used for the centers of plates. I’d like to use it in the border too.

Now if I could only get the poltergeist out of my sewing machine. I’ve got a Janome MC 10001. Last night I was sewing the plates onto the backgrounds. When I took my foot off the pedal the machine would stop for a second then start running again! I had to tap the foot pedal several times before it would stop. Not conducive to accurate sewing of points, is it? My DH is going to take the foot pedal into work and see if he can open it and clean off the contacts. I don’t know why they’d be dirty, the unit is completely sealed, but who knows. If nothing else it will be going to the shop for repair. Or to a priest for exorcism.

wpid-cindi-100-2010-01-6-05-34.png

I really like that! It’s so pretty – originally I thought you were going to do applique around the border, but maybe your applique fingers are worn out after the 9-patch/hourglass experience. Exorcism – rofl! Too bad you don’t live closer – I have a machine or two that I’ve recently acquired, you could use one as a loaner!
wpid-small-sig1-2010-01-6-05-34.png

Fun with EQ6

A while back my husband asked me to make a hunting quilt for him.  Ok, I can do that!  It needs to be rugged, durable, warm, heavy.  I immediately thought about denim.   I actually started making a denim quilt a few years ago.  I collected worn out jeans and cut 4-inch squares, but I ran out of denim and then realized (after the fact) that serging the blocks together was not the smartest idea, so it’s been living in a box in the garage.  I knew I’d come up with a use for it someday!

But then….

I happened to be shopping at the outlet store of a local factory that makes wool products.  In the remnant bin I found some heavy black wool and had an Aha! moment.  How about a wool top with a denim back?  Now THAT would be perfect for hunting, especially in snow!  My mom, who lives closer to the wonderful remnant bin than I do, has been stalking the factory and managed to snag a few more wool remnants – a beautiful cobalt blue and a deep, royal purple.  I added this to the black and started designing things in EQ6 to see if I had enough fabric.  That’s one of the great things about EQ – once you have a design, it will tell you how much of each fabric you need.  I’ve always wanted to do a feathered star, and making a huge one-block feathered star shouldn’t be too hard, right?  Here are some of the designs I’ve come up with.

wpid-feathered-star-1-2009-11-23-02-39.jpg

Hmm.  Not bad.  It measures 65″ by 65″.  The Hubster says it looks Indian.  I told him he probably means Amish.  Let’s jazz it up a bit, shall we?

wpid-feathered-star-2-2009-11-23-02-39.jpg

Interesting.  The first thing that comes to mind is that the blue diamonds on the outside look like Christmas lights.  (Or maybe it’s just that time of year…)

wpid-feathered-star-3-2009-11-23-02-39.jpg

I am really liking this one!  I think it’s snazzy without being overwhelming or distracting!  I’m not sure how difficult it would be to piece all those triangles, we are talking heavy wool, ya know.  The border is 4.25 inches wide.

I showed it to the Hubster, and he said he had imagined that I would make a quilt that was long and narrow, to cover his cot.  Well.  That throws a monkey wrench into the works, but I can adapt!

wpid-feathered-star-61-2009-11-23-02-39.jpg

I played with this one, setting the blocks first horizontally and then on point.  Horizontally put them right on top of each other with the points almost touching, on point gives them some space between.  I tried sashing but that ruined it.  This is what I love EQ for – isn’t it fun???  And this is just with the stuff that comes pre-loaded in EQ6 – I haven’t tried designing my own!  (Although I have thought it might look cool if I did some blue & purple half-square triangles in the border to match the star.  Gonna have to work on that one.)

So there you have it.  I’d love to get your thoughts and comments about the design.  Maybe you will think of something really neat!!!

wpid-large-sig1-2009-11-23-02-39.png

Fun with EQ6

A while back my husband asked me to make a hunting quilt for him.  Ok, I can do that!  It needs to be rugged, durable, warm, heavy.  I immediately thought about denim.   I actually started making a denim quilt a few years ago.  I collected worn out jeans and cut 4-inch squares, but I ran out of denim and then realized (after the fact) that serging the blocks together was not the smartest idea, so it’s been living in a box in the garage.  I knew I’d come up with a use for it someday!

But then….

I happened to be shopping at the outlet store of a local factory that makes wool products.  In the remnant bin I found some heavy black wool and had an Aha! moment.  How about a wool top with a denim back?  Now THAT would be perfect for hunting, especially in snow!  My mom, who lives closer to the wonderful remnant bin than I do, has been stalking the factory and managed to snag a few more wool remnants – a beautiful cobalt blue and a deep, royal purple.  I added this to the black and started designing things in EQ6 to see if I had enough fabric.  That’s one of the great things about EQ – once you have a design, it will tell you how much of each fabric you need.  I’ve always wanted to do a feathered star, and making a huge one-block feathered star shouldn’t be too hard, right?  Here are some of the designs I’ve come up with.

wpid-feathered-star-1-2009-11-23-02-38.jpg

Hmm.  Not bad.  It measures 65″ by 65″.  The Hubster says it looks Indian.  I told him he probably means Amish.  Let’s jazz it up a bit, shall we?

wpid-feathered-star-2-2009-11-23-02-38.jpg

Interesting.  The first thing that comes to mind is that the blue diamonds on the outside look like Christmas lights.  (Or maybe it’s just that time of year…)

wpid-feathered-star-3-2009-11-23-02-38.jpg

I am really liking this one!  I think it’s snazzy without being overwhelming or distracting!  I’m not sure how difficult it would be to piece all those triangles, we are talking heavy wool, ya know.  The border is 4.25 inches wide.

I showed it to the Hubster, and he said he had imagined that I would make a quilt that was long and narrow, to cover his cot.  Well.  That throws a monkey wrench into the works, but I can adapt!

wpid-feathered-star-61-2009-11-23-02-38.jpg

I played with this one, setting the blocks first horizontally and then on point.  Horizontally put them right on top of each other with the points almost touching, on point gives them some space between.  I tried sashing but that ruined it.  This is what I love EQ for – isn’t it fun???  And this is just with the stuff that comes pre-loaded in EQ6 – I haven’t tried designing my own!  (Although I have thought it might look cool if I did some blue & purple half-square triangles in the border to match the star.  Gonna have to work on that one.)

So there you have it.  I’d love to get your thoughts and comments about the design.  Maybe you will think of something really neat!!!

wpid-large-sig1-2009-11-23-02-38.png

 

 

 

Whoo-hoo! You’re playing again! I love looking at the things you create in EQ. I’ve got to say I’m attracted to the second one (the one that looks like it has the neon lights). I like the simplicity of it. I’ve gotta agree with you about the wool question. I’m afraid that the border in the third one might not work because of bulk, but who knows! The denim backing is a great idea. You wouldn’t have to worry about batting at all, and man, would that thing be warm! Can’t wait to see it made up…..

wpid-cindi-100-small-2009-11-23-02-38.png